VR Matrix Disassociation from Real Life

Start thinking about whether you REALLY can take the Blue pill or life is force feeding us the red one. Hamlet is pointing to an article in Rock Paper Shotgun titled: A Matrix Moment With The Vive.

"Last night..."

“Last night…”

The article is about the disassociation a Vive (VR Headset) user, Philippa Warr, feels after taking the headset off. He obviously hasn’t heard the warning coming from several sources about possible negative side effects from using 3D anything. Continue reading

Everyone Has Problems

This is proving to be a busy week for me. That means I spend the little time I have using aggregators to check the news I’m interested in, Drudge for current events and Feedly for everything else. This morning Feedly is down and Drudge is on about Kim Jung-un’s elitists’ sex parties, another story of males abusing women in a gun free society.

So, what’s up with Feedly? OMG, they don’t know; micro-outages, slowdowns… They need to check their logs… of which grow at the rate of 100gb per hour…

See: https://blog.feedly.com/

State of Graphics: DirectX 12 & Vulkan

In Second Life we run on OpenGL. Most Windows games run on DirectX. Microsoft has announced DirectX 12. It will essentially make NVIDIA 500 series and older cards obsolete. To use DX12 you’ll need a 600 or newer series card. This video explains what is happening. OpenGL is not left out.

It looks like ATI/AMD is making a replacement for OpenGL called Vulkan. It sounds like Vulcan is targeting more devices than DirectX 12. I expect to see Vulcan working on an Android mobile device way before DX12. I still have serious doubts we will see real time 3D render of good quality on mobile devices in the near future.

So, is the Lab planning to upgrade SL to Vulkan? I don’t know. I’ve asked. Vulkan is open source.

Word is OpenGL will still be developed. I think that odd. OpenGL is referred to in one place that came up in my research as a high level API, higher than Vulkan. The basic geek speak uses high and low to refer to how close you are to the hardware… the closer you get to the hardware the more programming you have to do. With higher level languages the more the language does for you.

Think of it this way… a low level addition command would be written as: place this value in Reg#1 and this other value in Reg2 then preform an XOR operation on then and place the result in Reg3 then move Reg3 to memory as variable X. A high level language would let you write the code as A + B = X and handle all the registers, operations and moves for you.

There are good reasons for using higher and lower level languages and API’s. But, generally we want API’s that produce more overall efficiency. From the other stuff said about Vulkan I would think it should be called a higher level API…. it does way more for the programmer. Whether it is higher or lower it is the next gen descendant of OpenGL.

For those of us playing in SL this means little today. But, suggests that play in Sansar will mean we will need a 600 series card or higher.

If you are looking for more details start at the Wikipedia: Vulkan API.

 

ODD: Intel Developers to use Second Life?

In my reading I came across this article on the Intel Developer site: Unity Tip: Using Second Life As A 3D Modeling Package.

Quoting:

You may need to use 3D modeling to create objects for your project but do not have the technical experience yet to do so, or find that your package of choice does not provide the feature that you need (for example, creating spheres in SketchUp is very difficult).  There is an alternative, user-friendly solution though.  You can create your objects in the online virtual reality world Second Life

I think that is pretty interesting…

Even more interesting is they promote the Firestorm Viewer as the viewer of choice. Their reason for recommending Firestorm is the Collada export feature found in Firestorm.

The article provides a tutorial on how to export 3D items from Second Life™ using the Firestorm viewer.

VR Latency

I suspect we have all heard about simulator sickness, akin to motion sickness, caused by latency/lag in providing images to VR headsets. Now NVIDIA is showing an experimental zero latency display. The site Road to VR has the story in an article: NVIDIA Demonstrates Experimental “Zero Latency” Display Running at 1,700Hz.

NVIDIA debuted their experimental display at GTC 2016. The current 90hz displays render an image every 11ms. NVIDIA gets an image on screen in 0.58ms. Wow.  Continue reading